The State Is Considering Authorizing Home Deliveries And Licensing More Companies To Produce And Sell The Various Forms Of Medical Marijuana Allowed Under State Law.

And while 12,764 patients have been certified across the state to obtain medical marijuana, it’s unclear how many actually use it. More Information To comment: tuletters@timesunion.com or at http://blog.timesunion.com/opinion Adding chronic pain to the conditions eligible for treatment is a positive step by the Department of Health, as are plans to add physician assistants to the list of medical providers who can certify patients to use medical marijuana. But a bigger problem cost remains. Medical marijuana can cost a patient hundreds of dollars a month. While cannabis may well be a better option for some who suffer from severe pain, it is not covered by insurance. And because marijuana is still illegal on a federal level and Congress doesn’t seem likely to get enlightened and change that anytime soon, all transactions must be cash only. As a result, some patients Medical marijuana stocks who may benefit from medical marijuana turn back to opioids, which may be fully or partly covered by health insurance and are available at most pharmacies. The state is considering authorizing home deliveries and licensing more companies to produce and sell the various forms of medical marijuana allowed under state law. Those are positive steps that would help increase accessibility. More competition could push down the price. If the state really wants to get the medication into the hands of people who can benefit, though, it must make it affordable.

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